Want all the benefits of Turmeric? Here’s what you should and shouldn’t do...

6 Mar 2020

Turmeric is as popular as it was 3.000 years ago. But now we know that there's a right way to take it and a pointless one. That is - if you want to get results.

You’ve probably heard of the turmeric and all the benefits this ayurvedic golden root can have on the human body and mind.

In Ayurveda, it was used to balance doshas, spark Agni and reduce Kapha and Ama. To put it very simply – it could fix all the imbalances in our body and spirit, improve the metabolism and help the system remove harmful things (like toxins).

Now that science has researched this magical spice more, we have a better understanding of turmeric's power.

EFSA - The European Food Safety Authority, the agency of the European Union that provides independent scientific advice – and several studies show that turmeric:

  • Supports the function of the nervous system
  • Helps maintain liver health, prevents the accumulation of fats and facilitates their elimination by the liver
  • Helps maintain the health of the lungs and the upper respiratory tract
  • Supports the cardiovascular system
  • Helps maintain the efficacy of the immune system and resistance to allergies
  • Has significant antioxidative properties
  • Helps keep the skin healthy
  • Helps support the digestion
  • Has anti-inflammatory effects and relieves inflammation
  • Relieves muscle and joint pain and contributes to joint health

Learn the difference between turmeric and curcumin

  • Turmeric is a plant – a golden root from which we make the yellow spice we usually use in Indian cuisine.
  • Curcumin is the active part of the plant. It's like chlorophyll in greenery. It's what makes turmeric oh so powerful.

Roughly speaking, curcumin constitutes only 3% of the plant. The rest is a root with the nutritional profile of a carrot: the majority of it is fibre and natural sugars with a little bit of fat and protein.

If you’re thinking that you can crack this one by eating a lot of turmeric, let’s do some simple math.

How much turmeric powder spice should you eat then?

Indians are known to eat more turmeric than any other nation. The average Indian diet is estimated to provide about 2–3 g (a teaspoon) of turmeric powder spice daily, which translates into only around 0,06–0,11 g of curcumin.

Numerous studies have found that we should consume at least 1 g of curcumin daily to get the best results(for different effects, 1-6 g portion of curcumin/day is required).

And even this is misleading since the majority of studies checked the effect of curcumin by injecting curcumin directly in the bloodstream. Digestion would demand a much higher dose to be as effective.

Quite honestly, you cannot eat enough turmeric to get the benefits it promises (if you’re not able to eat 100 teaspoons of turmeric spice per day, that is). There is another way you can get enough curcumin though.

While the turmeric spice only contains some 3% of curcumin, extracts used in food supplements pack up to 95% of it.

So, while a teaspoon of turmeric spice would provide you with 0,03 g of curcumin, a food supplement containing 1 g of curcumin extract would give you around 0,95 g of curcumin.

After this discovery, food supplements with curcumin extract started fighting the odds by trying to increase the bioavailability of curcumin with black pepper extract.

A new generation of turmeric supplements came along that found the ultimate solution. Micelle technology, called micellization, ensures the delivery of the maximum amount of useful substances to the body. In the case of curcumin, this technology ensures a substantial increase in bioavailability.

The micellar form of curcumin makes it 185x more bioavailable!

If you're looking for the best results, it’s also advised to take curcumin supplements for at least 3 months.

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